Klára Sedlo, born in 1993, is a student of The Academy of Fine Arts in Prague. She has started under leadership of M. Rittstein in 2014. In the present time, she is going to graduate under the leadership of J. Petrbok.

View - Curriculum Vitae and Exhibition List of Klára Sedlo

Despite her age, Klára is very active painter, with several dozens of solo and group exhibitions arranged in Europe. Klara is well-known and easily recognisable for her specific style of paintings. Her artworks are full of hidden meanings, mystic features and contrasts. That's what make her one of the most promising painters of the upcoming generation.

Artist Statement

My paintings are tightly connected with childhood, mostly in the way that I construct them - similarly to children, I personify things. The objects in my paintings, therefore represent living people, emotions or desires. For example, I express the feeling of being home through marshmallow trees and lamp in the shape of house on the wall, these create an idea of cozy light cabin at the edge of the woods. Conversely the shiny glittering unicorn can bear the meaning of easy, superficially, beautiful lies, while the old toy black horse refers to something ugly but truthful. And a view of a blue sky means unreachable happiness – although we see it, it is too difficult to reach it. My paintings are thus charged with symbolism.

As mentioned above, the way I perceive the world is similar to the way children see it – full of ,,living” things which can become bearers of meanings. However I don't focus solely on childrens toys and nostalgic memories in my compositions. I mostly depict useless things which adults buy to keep their sadness at bay – the shiny, cute and fluffy nonsenses, sweets and knick-knacks through which we try to buy the feeling of calm and happiness – a feeling that is as unreachable as the blue sky.

I aim to convey modern superficial society. People are consumed by the fear of seeking the truth; they opt to remain on the surface of things, never venturing into the deeper meanings. The society's choice is never to look deeper; never to ask if the man with horns on his head is evil or whether he just wants us to see something ugly but truthful. The choice is never to ask if those nice kitschy things are really what we need to achieve happiness. I aim to create paintings that prompt us to ask: who is really the devil here? What is hidden behind the shiny beautiful objects?

The catharsis of these ideas lies in my series called "About Superficiality" a collection of several two-meter sized canvases full of symbols and hidden meanings. In these series as well as in my all other pieces, I create my own artistic "language" to express myself, as the existing ones simply does not fit my "words".