Julie Hauver is of European descent (Dutch) but grew up in a quiet little town in Québec, Canada. Hauver used to spend most of her time in the forest surrounding her neighbourhood. More interested in art and nature then social activities, she showed a deep interest in creation and science. As a child, drawing  became her main way of expressing her feelings. Since communication did not come easy with words, she prefers to share her ideas by creating pictures, paintings and building different kinds of objects. Collecting bones, shells and natural materials becomes a way to deal with fear and isolation.

Sometimes dark, sometimes bright, the world created by Hauver can be found at the frontier of reality. Uncertainty and doubt are present, the extremes are taking places in the form of attack or escape, calm or violence. Getting close to abstract but never really falling into it, the work of the artist reflects a deformed reality that looks like a dream. Strange and lonely characters meet animals or fantastic creatures. Spaces are wild, mysterious, full of lively colours and contrasts. Bodies are nude, out of time or social boundaries. Primitive, hurt or deformed, the anatomy does not fit the basic norms of beauty. The eyes are usually wide open and black, sometimes looking intensely at the viewers, yet other times looking far away, trying to find light in the emptiness or torment. These characters are talking to us, silently. The forest is never far away.

Hauver has a Bachelors Degree in Visual Arts and Media. Since then, she took part in many solo artistic events and exhibitions. She also received the first price at EICV (Évenement Interuniversitaire de Création Vidéo) in Montreal, Québec. Her sculptural project NIDS consisting in building giant nests in the forest of Nuns Island made the front page twice of the local newspaper Le Magazine. Beside her painting practice she is currently working on a sculpture project using fish bones to create many delicate sculptures of strange insects and animals.