Boris Pecigos

Boris Pecigoš is Croatian Artist born in 1974 in Zagreb. He earned a master’s degree in visual arts (thesis on land art) and bachelor’s degree in painting (thesis on expressiveness of the line and color in painting) at the Arthouse – College of Visual Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He is a member of HDLU Zagreb (Croatian Society of Visual Artists Zagreb) and Immagine & Poesia international movement. Famous for his vivid 6.5 km long Land Art Trail in Učka Nature Park, he has also exhibited in numerous solo and group shows.

The transcendence of music and poetry, new age mysticism, unfathomable mystery of transience and death, mysterious prehistoric drawings, figures and erected stones, and above all the beauty of nature, which is, in Rijeka where he lives, mirrored in touch of the sea and the mountains – all this is inspiration for his artistic creation. His mediums are painting and land art, while rock art (painting the rocks in nature) connects the two. Boris also write poetry. Sometimes his paintings and poems are linked, that is, some idea is simultaneously manifested in art and literary media.

The frequent motif of his paintings are trees and their mythological and spiritual symbolism. He also explores the form of the mandala and search the mysticism of ancient symbols (spirals, circles, sun, etc.). Sometimes, Pecigos uses a Glagolitic and Arabic alphabet. With a strong colour and/or dynamic expression of lyrical abstraction, he tries to express the emotions that arise from the concept that leads him to the creation of the work. Emphasised relief and texture of the surface make possible to experience his works in a tactile way, which he finds very important.

Land Art and Rock Art allow him to connect his art in the most direct manner with his love for nature and interest in geology and historical places with the remains of old cultures. In land art, he often includes his understanding of what is spiritual, and tries to evoke that mystical, ritual and sacred attitude to the forces of nature, inherent in ancient cults. He can communicate with the audience more directly through land art works than through paintings, because they are interactive – they call for entering or touching them, thus achieving not only visual, but also an important tactile contact with both the work itself and the surrounding nature, which would not be possible in the gallery.
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